Lightning
Date: 11/11/2011 Album ID: 1360176
Photos by St. Petersburg Times Staff
Over the entire year, the highest frequency of cloud-to-ground lightning is in Florida between Tampa and Orlando. This is due to the presence, on many days during the year, of a large moisture content in the atmosphere at low levels (below 5,000 feet), as well as high surface temperatures that produce strong sea breezes along the Florida coasts.
Bolts of lightning crackle above the Gulf of Mexico during a storm off Clearwater Beach on Friday evening, creating an electrifying Florida summer scene.   Jim Damaske | Times
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Lightning crashes over the Clearwater area as couple watches the show from their pickup truck on the Dunedin Causeway. 	John Pendygraft | Times
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A bolt of lightning seems to hit the Bayfront Towers building in Downtown St. Petersburg.   Ricardo Ferro | Times
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The Dunedin Causeway bridge is silhouetted against a lightning strike as it reflects off St. Joseph Sound in Dunedin late.  Douglas R. Clifford | Times
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Lightning flashes as a storm approaches Clearwater Beach late Wednesday morning sending some beachgoers back to their cars.  JIM DAMASKE  |  Times
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Heavy Thunderstorms moved through Pinellas County Saturday night, producing heavy rain and spectacular lightning displays, like this bolt that hit the Sunshine Skyway bridge as seen from a rest stop along Interstate 275 south of the bridge.  Eric Parsons | Times
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A bolt of lightning blazes through the eerie twilight sky as a storm front passes over drivers on SR 44 west of Inverness.   Ron Thompson | Times
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Thunder heads moved in the area and drenched  most of the county, bringing an excellent lightning display.  Ricardo Ferro | Times
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A bolt of lightning  hits Old Tampa Bay during a thunder storm. The photo looks south across the bay toward the Howard Frankland Bridge from the Courtney Campbell Causeway.   Skip O'Rourke | Times
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The St. Petersburg Pier is pictured as lightning crackles in the distance.  CHRIS ZUPPA | Times
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 As the sun sets, a bolt of lightning strikes through a rain storm over the Miami Canal at Mack's Fishing Camp in the Florida Everglades.   Maurice Rivenbark  | Times
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Lightning strikes near Clearwater Beach over Clearwater Harbor Tuesday afternoon.   JIM DAMASKE | Times
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Lightning strikes near Clearwater Beach over Clearwater Harbor Tuesday afternoon.  JIM DAMASKE | Times
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Lightning strikes near Clearwater Beach over Clearwater Harbor Tuesday afternoon.   JIM DAMASKE | Times
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Weather feature.  A lightning flash illuminates the night sky and Gulf of Mexico near downtown Clearwater on Wednesday (6/10/2004). Lightning flashes lasts about a quarter of a second and consists of 3 or 4 individual discharges called strokes. Each stroke lasts a few ten thousandths of a second. The flicker observed in lightning is due to seeing the actual strokes making up the flash.  Lightning strokes begins with a predischarge, called the leader, which goes from the cloud to the ground. The leader sets a path for the return stroke (what you really see) which comes up from the ground to the cloud. The first stroke of a flash is preceded by a stepped leader, so called because it appears to progress in steps from cloud to ground.
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Lightning bolts reach across the downtown St. Petersburg water front skyline as strong thunder storms made their way through the bay area.	MAURICE RIVENBARK | Times
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